Nonprofit Board Members Responsible for Future

nonprofit boardNonprofit Board members must sell and market to grow an organization

Congratulations, you’re on the Board of Directors for a nonprofit organization.

Now, what — what will your committee assignment be? Finance, Membership, Special Programs, Communications — the list of possibilities seems endless.

Well, congratulations AGAIN, because even if you don’t think you can sell or market, that’s what EVERY board member becomes in a nonprofit organization — a salesperson and a marketer! In addition to all other responsibilities, nonprofit board members must be able to advance the cause of the organization.

You were asked to join the board, and now it’s your responsibility to begin MARKETING the organization and SELLING the organization’s benefits to the community. Yes, you and your fellow board members will wear both hats.

That’s because successful sales people are always marketing and good marketers are always thinking about the sales and where they’re coming from (and will come from). That’s how your nonprofit organization will grow — by packaging your vision and mission, identifying the community (the niches) that will benefit from being associated with your organization and then selling it to that community.

And by selling it, you generate membership, which generates revenue, which generates more opportunities for growth, and, well, you can see how this cycle continues. Remember that one community begets another community and that’s how the marketing and sales cycle works — in business AND nonprofit organizations.

So, the bottom line is this: if you agree to become a member of a nonprofit board, be prepared to learn how to market and sell. You’ll need those skills in the nonprofit and business world.

Joseph R. John

The Media Conundrum

Chet Huntley and David BrinkleyIs the media serving its public?

My previous life as a television station general manager was spent during a period of local newscast expansion. Costs of syndicated programs like “Oprah” contributed to the decision to “just add another half-hour of local news” to the schedule.  The problem was always doing it with existing resources to save money.  As more television stations followed suit an obvious (seems obvious) result was denigration of quality and coverage.

Now a recent federal study of the media soon to be published points out a serious decline in reporting on a local level.  Particularly alarming in the study is the finding that coverage of state governments and municipalities has receded at such a quickening pace that it has left government with more power than ever to set the agenda and have assertions unchallenged.

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Weiner Brand Suffers Hail Damage

Mark WeinerWhen Wiener tweeted like no body’s business,he actually was hurting his own. His personal brand has been taking a relentless beating since his tweets to young women surfaced. And today’s story on “Weiner tweeting a 17 yr old girl from Delaware” doesn’t help either.
There are cries from all quarters for Weiner’s resignation. But Mr. Weiner has been unrelenting, he doesn’t want to resign. So regardless of what happens,the big questions is, would the Weiner brand survive? How much credibility and trust would he have in the congress?

We decided to post a few choice quotes from readers on Yahoo this morning (June 11): → continue reading

Mr. Weiner, sir – what were you thinking?

Mark WeinerMr. Weiner, sir – what were you thinking? 

First rule of positive PR – do positive, uplifting, morally defensible deeds. Oh boy.  Sorry Mr. W. — missed on all three. So once again, what you say and what you did took diverse routes. And you’re taken by surprise?  So you lie and keep lying.  Huh?

Mr. Weiner now says he’s sorry and takes full responsibility to everyone he’s harmed. Mr. Weiner says he’s sorry for lying to the media.  How about cheating on your new wife?  Yes, you did cheat.  Ask Jimmy Carter.

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The Misrepresentation of Being “Leader.”

LeadershipAs we head into what will likely become one of the nastiest and most distasteful political seasons in history, I want to reflect on a recent, quality discussion I had with several friends about “service” and what it represents, especially to the individual who’s serving. The discussion centered around the difference between those who offer up their time and talents to “serve” and those who claim that what they are doing is “leading.”

The easiest example of this distinction can be found within the political spectrum. People running for office very liberally use the word “serve” to describe what they intend to do for their community, city, state, country, etc. Once elected to office, that term, and many times the actual activity in which they engage, ceases to reflect serving their constituents. It becomes what they then describe as “leading.”

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