Archive for January, 2014

Non Profit Board Resolutions for 2014

Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

Is Your Non Profit Board Ready to Tackle 2014?

By Joseph John

Two years ago, I wrote an article about making and keeping non profit board resolutions. I thought it would be fair to dust off that document from 2012 and see what — if anything — has changed with your non profit’s organizational resolutions for the New Year.

The first question you need to ask is this: Were there ANY formalized resolutions for 2012 or 2013? Was there a board retreat (or at least a special meeting) to determine goals/resolutions for those years? Another question: Were there ANY personal commitments from board members to contribute to the organization’s growth, health, and well-being? And so here we are heading into 2014; what has your organization accomplished over the past two years? What do you hope to accomplish in 2014?

Non profit board resolutions are really no different than the personal resolutions individuals make. Oh yes, there are always great intentions behind those resolutions, but invariably, there are periods through the year that the resolutions tail-off into a nose-dive, one-by-one. What resolutions an organization needs are the same as an individual — manageable resolutions. Yes manageable resolutions that will encourage board commitment AND follow-through during the entire year.

You’ve probably seen dozens of resolutions before, but let’s reinforce some of the ones below that you and your board can and should make. These are resolutions that will ultimately make a difference to the community you serve.

First things first: Determine where your organization exists on the mediocrity-good-great continuum. What will move you and the organization from mediocrity to good. What will move you from good to great? [Note: see my article “Moving Beyond Mediocrity”]

Second: You may remember an article I wrote regarding “Organizational Milestones.” In that article, I stated that an historical timeline creates a better grasp for seeing trends over the almost thirteen years since the millennium to determine what the next one, three, or five years might look like. It’s a great planning tool. And yes, I’ve already tested this concept with a number of associations that I deal with — and they collectively say “OMG…that would be fantastic for all of us to review.”

Let me ask you: Does your non profit organization have the organizational “guts”, that is, the commitment, to set the bar higher, and to venture into new markets that you haven’t approached before? Is your organizational “vision” aggressive enough to make reaching for new goals a real challenge?

The following resolutions, or goals, are not new. You’ve seen them before. However, it’s time to review each one and determine which of the following items your organization can achieve in order to reach higher and ultimately move from Mediocrity to Good to Greatness. Let’s recap:

Friend (member) raise. Remember the axiom: “Friend raising comes before fund raising.”

Open the box. Now seal it! Be different. Be unique. Make people say, “now that’s a unique and creative non profit organization.”

Raise communication awareness internally. Start talking to each other — board members and staff members. If you can’t communicate clearly among yourselves, then the next resolution is going to fall flat on its face.

Raise communication awareness in the community. Again, “open the box” and start thinking of unique ways that will generate POSITIVE communication throughout the community.

Raise your hand. That’s right! Don’t sit on your hands. When you start leaning towards delegation, then delegate to yourself first.

Raise the bar. Set some higher goals for friend raising, fund raising, and other initiatives that require going that “extra mile,” and beyond!

Dust off the bylaws, vision, mission, and values. Challenge, if need be. Change or modify them if necessary. DON’T wait. Mediocrity is mired in dusty old bylaws, vision, mission, and values.

Take ownership. “It’s Your Board.” Make yourself an owner of the organization and begin pushing for excellence, unity, and most importantly trust.

Sow the seeds of board recruitment. Recruit and groom new talent on the board and that means looking towards the “X” and “Y” generations so they can become the future leaders on your non profit board and great community spokespersons.

Try a fresh coat of paint. Determine if your organization’s image needs a fresh coat of paint to create a brand new, and vibrant, organization to the community.

Plan for the future. Focus on the here-and-now with an eye for keeping the pipeline of future funding open for your organization.

Say “thank you.” Two little words are two HUGE words. “Thank you” is one of the greatest ice-breakers, which leads right into friend-raising — and the cycle continues from friend raising to fund raising.

The previous twelve (12) resolutions were presented in 2012 and again in 2013. Has anything changed in your non profit organization since then? Go ahead and rank-order the ones that you and your fellow board members can work on immediately. Commit to excellence. Resolve to keep your resolutions for 2014. Remember that keeping your resolutions will result in benefits for you, your organization, and the communities you serve.

Non Profits: Reaching Across the Aisle

Monday, January 6th, 2014

And Reaching Across the Non Profit Boardroom Table

By Joseph John

My good friend and I were having coffee recently and discussing everything from sports to — gulppolitics. We both rolled our eyes at the fact that our leaders in Washington have become so combative, so alienated, so out-of-touch, that they have fallen deaf to the electorate. Unfortunately, they seem to be focused strictly on their personal agendas — not their constituents’ wishes. Republicans, Democrats, and whatever’s seem to forget that it’s the good of the country that should be their primary focus, and not a matter of W’s and L’s on their personal scorecard. Oh, yes, I can be naive. However, politics and the country’s direction can’t be construed as a game. Well, I could continue, but the focus of this article is not on the dysfunction in Washington D.C.

No. Unfortunately, dysfunction, personal agendas, and personal scorecards find their way into every strata of society, and that includes the non profit sector. “Oh, surely you jest, Mr. John. Isn’t “altruism” the rule of the day in the nonprofit sector?” Oh, PUHLEASE.

Think about how many people join a non profit board and immediately bring THEIR personal agenda to the table. Reflect on the number of boards you have joined and the lineup of folks who already are lobbying hard for their ideas to be implemented. I’m sure you have dealt with some people who tend to implement roughshod over other board members’ beliefs and values. It seems to take virtually no time at all for some board members to alienate others because, quite simply, their philosophy is this: My way or the highway.

Many of my articles have focused on individuals — the people who hold up their hands to join a non profit board. People joining a board are coming in from so many directions, mindsets and lifestyles.  With that in mind, my question(s) are always the same: Just WHY did you join the board? What’s in it for you? What is that you want to achieve and do for society? And just as important, did the membership/nominating committee perform due diligence in screening this person?

A non profit board, unfortunately, is not insulated from the same negative human traits that we see on a daily basis in Washington or state capitals for that matter. It appears to me that there are too many people who believe that compromise is a weakness rather than a strength.  “I won’t give in. I won’t yield. My way is the correct way and the only way.”

Compromise is not a weakness — it is a strength. Compromise is strength because you have the organization’s best interest(s) at heart, not your personal agenda. You are willing to reach across the aisle/across the boardroom table because the good of the organization is more important than your personal agenda. A dear friend who was involved in contract negotiations prior to her retirement says that “compromise is a way for all sides to ‘win’ something. Unless it is a life threatening issue, compromise is always possible.”

Remember one of the most important questions the membership committee was supposed to ask the potential candidate: CAN you/WILL you learn to “play nice” and become a TEAM player with a group of people who also are contributing their free time to serve? Somewhere, in that interviewing process, questions have to be asked in such a way as to ensure the candidate understands the role of the individual in relation to the good of the non profit organization.

Melanie Lockwood Herman, Executive Director of the Nonprofit Risk Management Center, best captures the importance of compromise, ie, reaching across the table or aisle, with this comment:

Compromise is a basic instinct for non profit leaders. Discerning when compromise may impair mission fulfillment, however, is a skill we must learn and practice. Resisting the urge to compromise may not be easy, but it is necessary to protect the mission of your organization and your commitment to deliver on that mission each and every day.

Yes, in the ideal world, the nonprofit sector can be the prototype of collaboration and compromise for ALL sectors of society to work for the common good — it’s just a matter of reaching across the aisle.