Non Profit Organizations – Can You Make a Decision?

Is Your Non Profit Organization Suffering from Analysis Paralysis?

By Joseph John

It’s not a perfect world, and it’s definitely not a perfect world in the non profit sector when it comes to decision making.

Decisions have to be made, and projects need to be implemented — on a timely basis. And yet, there are too many non profit boards that suffer from Analysis Paralysis.

Wikipedia defines Analysis Paralysis as “…the state of over-analyzing (or over-thinking) a situation, or citing sources, so that a decision or action is never taken, in effect paralyzing the outcome. A decision can be treated as over-complicated, with too many detailed options, so that a choice is never made, rather than try something and change if a major problem arises.

We talk about a non profit board’s “fiduciary responsibility,” and yet, we tend to ignore, or mention another major board responsibility — the need to ACT. I believe that a board’s inactivity and fear of initiating projects on a timely basis ranks extremely high on the list of costly board errors.

“Let’s discuss this at the next meeting,” or “I think we need more time,” or “ I think we need more information.” Sound familiar?

Are there any ground rules a board can establish in order to avert that insidious organizational illness called Analysis Paralysis? The answer simply is “yes.”

Here are some basic steps to get your non profit organization moving towards a healthy and vibrant organization.

  1. Eliminate the fear of failure. Failure only occurs when you don’t do anything.
  2. Accept the unknown. There is not enough data to eliminate the unknown — it’s a fact of life.
  3. Eliminate the search for more data by establishing a “no read” zone and a “no more data” zone — and stick to those rules.
  4. Establish a timeline by putting a stake in the ground — and stick to it (no pun intended).
  5. Establish ground rules for implementing your specific project — and stick to those ground rules.
  6. Establish board consensus that the entire board is unified and committed to action; and willing to take the kudos and the lumps, if they occur.
  7. Embrace the fear of inactivity.

What’s the worst thing that can happen to a non profit board by moving forward? Nothing negative. And why? Because you have just given the “data seekers and crunchers” even more data to analyze once the project has been implemented.

So, eliminate Analysis Paralysis and make your organization Nike-like — “Just Do It!”

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